Spinecare Topics

  • By: ISA Content Team
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Understanding Back Pain
Common Causes of Back Pain

Back pain is a very common condition. Despite being of epidemic proportions, it remains a poorly understood condition. Back pain is a symptom and does not represent a specific diagnosis. Physicians often use the diagnosis of lumbalgia to describe pain in the low back.  The term literally means low back pain.


The cause for back pain may be simple or complex. It may be associated with pain arising from one cause or many causes. In many cases the exact cause for back pain is not determined. There is usually a physical or mechanical factor, which contributes to the onset of back pain. Most individuals who develop low back pain are predisposed secondary to underlying conditions, structural abnormalities and/or because of prior cumulative microtrauma, which render spinal tissues more vulnerable. There are many conditions, which can lead to the development of back pain especially in predisposed people. Some of these conditions are listed below.


  • Overuse and repetitive motions involving use of the back muscles
  • Making an awkward motion
  • Poorly performed stretching in connection with an exercise routine
  • Trying to lift something too heavy or improperly
  • Longstanding poor posture
  • Poor core muscle strength
  • Deconditioning

Educational Partners

To learn more about your spine. spinehealth, and available spinecare go to the International Spine Assocition (ISA) at www.spineinformation.org. The primary mission of the ISA is to improve spinehealth and spinecare through education. The ISA is committed to disseminating need-to-know information throught the World Wide Web in numerous languages covering many topics related to the spine, including information about spine disorders, spine heath, advances in technology and available spinecare



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All health information posted on the site is based on the latest research and national treatment standards, and have been written or reviewed and appoved by the American Acedemy of Spine Physicians and/or International Spine Association physicians or health professionals unless otherwise specified.



The information provided on this site is designed to support. not replace,
the relationship that exists between patient/site visitor and his/her physician.